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~ William Ford Gibson ~

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Author #20

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born 17 Mar 1948 (+69) age 69 (+0)

10 books online (5 MiB in 32,850 paragraphs)

William Ford Gibson (born March 17, 1948) is an American-Canadian writer who has been called the "noir prophet" of the cyberpunk subgenre of science fiction. Gibson coined the term "cyberspace" in his short story "Burning Chrome" and later popularized the concept in his debut novel, Neuromancer (1984). In envisaging cyberspace, Gibson created an iconography for the information age before the ubiquity of the Internet in the 1990s. He is also credited with predicting the rise of reality television and with establishing the conceptual foundations for the rapid growth of virtual environments such as video games and the Web.

Having changed residence frequently with his family as a child, Gibson became a shy, ungainly teenager who often read science fiction. After spending his adolescence at a private boarding school in Arizona, Gibson dodged the draft during the Vietnam War by emigrating to Canada in 1968, where he became immersed in the counterculture and after settling in Vancouver eventually became a full-time writer. He retains dual citizenship. Gibson's early works are bleak, noir near-future stories about the effect of cybernetics and computer networks on humans – a "combination of lowlife and high tech". The short stories were published in popular science fiction magazines. The themes, settings and characters developed in these stories culminated in his first novel, Neuromancer, which garnered critical and commercial success, virtually initiating the cyberpunk literary genre.

Although much of Gibson's reputation has remained associated with Neuromancer, his work has continued to evolve. After expanding on Neuromancer with two more novels to complete the dystopic Sprawl trilogy, Gibson became an important author of another science fiction sub-genre — steampunk — with the 1990 alternate history novel The Difference Engine, written with Bruce Sterling. In the 1990s, he composed the Bridge trilogy of novels, which focused on sociological observations of near-future urban environments and late capitalism. His most recent novels — Pattern Recognition (2003) and Spook Country (2007) — are set in a contemporary world and have put his work onto mainstream bestseller lists for the first time.

Gibson is one of the best-known North American science fiction writers, fêted by The Guardian in 1999 as "probably the most important novelist of the past two decades". Gibson has written more than twenty short stories and nine critically acclaimed novels (one in collaboration), and has contributed articles to several major publications and collaborated extensively with performance artists, filmmakers and musicians. His thought has been cited as an influence on science fiction authors, design, academia, cyberculture, and technology.

 

CoverAll Tomorrow's Parties

Science Fiction, 1999OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

Although Colin Laney (from Gibson's earlier novel Idoru) lives in a cardboard box, he has the power to change the world. Thanks to an experimental drug that he received during his youth, Colin can see "nodal points" in the vast streams of data that make up the worldwide computer network. Nodal points are rare but significant events in history that forever change society, even though they might not ...

CoverCount Zero

Science Fiction, 1986OnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOn

The second volume of the Sprawl trilogy, which begins with Neuromancer and concludes with Mona Lisa Overdrive, and a canonical example of the cyberpunk sub-genre. Serialized by Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine in the 1986 January (100th issue), February and March issues. Nominated for the Locus and British Science Fiction Awards in 1986, as well as the Hugo and Nebula awards in 1987.

CoverIdoru

Science Fiction, 1996OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

The New York Times bestselling author takes readers to 21st-century Tokyo after the millennial quake--where something violently new is about to erupt. ‘Gibson's inventiveness is a sublime amalgam of high-tech and kitsch… This novel confirms its author as a pioneering topographer of cyberspace… it would be hard to think of a writer who does more to test the value of the tangible’ – Da ...

CoverMona Lisa Overdrive

Science Fiction, 1988OnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOff

Mona Lisa Overdrive is a cyberpunk novel by William Gibson published in 1988 and the final novel of the Sprawl trilogy, following Neuromancer and Count Zero. It takes place eight years after the events of Count Zero and is set, as were its predecessors, in The Sprawl. The novel was nominated for the Nebula Award for Best Novel, the Hugo Award for Best Novel, and the Locus Award for Best Science Fi ...

CoverNeuromancer

Science Fiction, 1984OnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOn

Notable for being the most famous early cyberpunk novel and winner of the science-fiction "triple crown" — the Nebula Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, and the Hugo Award. It was Gibson's first novel and the beginning of the Sprawl trilogy. The novel tells the story of a washed-up computer hacker hired by a mysterious employer to work on the ultimate hack. Gibson explores artificial intellige ...

CoverPattern Recognition

Science Fiction, 2003OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

Set in August and September 2002, the story follows Cayce Pollard, a 32-year-old marketing consultant who has a psychological sensitivity to corporate symbols. The action takes place in London, Tokyo, and Moscow as Cayce judges the effectiveness of a proposed corporate symbol and is hired to seek the creators of film clips anonymously posted to the internet. The novel's central theme involves t ...

CoverSpook Country

Thriller, 2007OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

Spook Country is a 2007 novel by speculative fiction author William Gibson. A political thriller set in contemporary North America, it followed on from the author's previous novel, Pattern Recognition (2003), and was succeeded in 2010 by Zero History, which featured much of its core cast of characters. The plot comprises the intersecting tales of three protagonists: Hollis Henry, a musician-turned ...

CoverThe Peripheral

Science Fiction, 2014OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

The novel focuses on Flynne and her brother, Burton. Burton is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps' elite Haptic Recon force. Flynne and Burton become involved in a security job that may actually be connected to murder. According to GQ's Zach Baron "The Peripheral is an emphatic return to the science fiction he ceased to write after the turn of this century, set in not one but two futur ...

CoverVirtual Light

Science Fiction, 1993OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

Berry Rydell, an ex-cop, signs on with IntenSecure Armed Response in Los Angeles. He finds himself on a collision course that results in a desperate romance, and a journey into the ecstasy and dread that mirror each other at the heart of the postmodern experience. Virtual Light is the first book in William Gibson's Bridge trilogy. Virtual Light is a science-fiction novel set in a postmodern, dy ...

CoverZero History

Science Fiction, 2010OffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOffOff

Zero History is a novel by William Gibson published in 2010. It concludes the informal trilogy begun by Pattern Recognition (2003) and continued by Spook Country (2007), and features the characters Hollis Henry and Milgrim from the latter novel as its protagonists.

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